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The LBEB Mental Health Series

Below is a collection of videos I made on various topics regarding mental health, including depression, suicide, my developmental, and the comparisons of mental health issues like you’re trading Pokemon cards. See the videos and their descriptions below.

I get pretty personal and introspective in my video today, and I want to discuss my learning/developmental disorders, and how they have shaped me as a person, a lifter, and a business owner. The most important thing you can do if you have these things is to talk to someone about them. If you know someone who suffers from them, the most important thing you can do is listen.

You aren’t alone, and there are resources available for you to use, to help you through your trying situations.
Here are some links that explain in a little more detail about my own issues, and how you can re-purpose them into positives, rather than negatives in your life:

http://www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/nld.htm

A few months ago, I made a video about my mental illness, and how it has shaped my existence. I decided to make a followup video regarding mental illness, and discuss how opening up to others about your issues can cause the listener to think it’s a “competition”, because they know someone else who has a “worse” problem, so yours isn’t that bad. Mental illness is not a competition, and that is what I discuss in this video. Thanks in advance for taking the time to watch it.

In the latest installment in my mental health series, I have decided to discuss a topic that I spend a great deal of time dwelling on; suicide. There has been a great deal of death in my life this year, some voluntary, some not, and combined with the suicide of my uncle before I was born, I felt it was a good topic to bring up. I also discuss how this culture of “suck it up/tough it out” can directly contribute to feelings of isolation, which can lead to suicide. I also discuss the hypocrisy of this culture, which will, in turn, tell people that those who say “suck it” are not going to be safe people to open up to. Physical ailments are easy to understand, because you can SEE them. Mental issues are not so visible, and can be easily dismissed or mocked, which further leads to feelings of isolation. Mental health is just as important as physical health, and I feel that these things need to be discussed, in order to make well-rounded individuals, which will, in turn, make for a better society. Thanks for taking the time to watch this, let me know your thoughts in the comments.

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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How Long Do I Rest In Between Sets?

A very common question we are asked, by both online and in-person clients, “How long should I rest in between sets?” Here I outline how long I recommend resting for each of the following:

Compound lifts.
Assistance lifts .
Bodybuilding movements.

If you have questions, let me know in the comments.

 

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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How The “Real Woman” Movement Can Harm Itself

In today’s video, I discuss what I refer to as the ‘Real Woman Movement” (Real women have curves, no thigh gaps, etc), how it can actually hold itself back, and can cause more more than good. I use some examples from my own experiences as a coach, as well as examples from the experiences of African-American women during the period of second-wave feminism. This is not a feminist-bashing video, I am a feminist myself, so if you want to see some bashing, you can check out a Dan Bilzerian video. Please enjoy, and let’s get a discussion going.

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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Why “Wanting to Inspire People” Isn’t a Real Goal

In today’s video, I want to discuss the concept of “I want to inspire people / I want to be the reason someone doesn’t give up.” Of course I don’t think that being inspiring is bad, inspiration is great! However, inspiring people shouldn’t be your goal, because it’s not a goal, it’s a cry for attention. Instead, it should be a byproduct of the actual goals you’re trying to achieve. It’s similar to the concept I’ve discussed before, regarding the difference between people who want to BE strong, vs. people who want to GET strong. Let me know what you think in the comments, thanks in advance for watching.

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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Are You An Alpha Male?

In today’s video, I want to discuss what makes up the alpha male, and why it isn’t what you think. I discuss the outdated hypothesis of the alpha wolf, and how that pertains to humans today. I also discuss why buying beer, bacon, whiskey and lots of guns doesn’t make you an alpha male, it makes you a sucker for marketing (much like Girl Power in the 90’s, and the female empowerment movement today). Thanks in advance for watching.

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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How To Make The Best Spaghetti In Existence

Forget marinara sauce. Forget everything you think you know about spaghetti. Today I am going to show you how to make the best spaghetti you’ve ever had, or your money back: Spaghetti Bolognese. This type of spaghetti is light on the tomatoes and heavy on flavors that are brought together from a variety of ingredients you don’t normally see in a spaghetti sauce. In addition to these ingredients, you will find that Bolognese sauce ditches the conventional herbs you usually see in a spaghetti sauce, like basil and oregano. Originating from Bologna, Italy, Spaghetti Bolognese is a meat-based sauce that is great for lifters who need more protein in their life, as well as non-lifters that simply enjoy amazing food. I have spent a lot of time on this recipe figuring out the ratios and cook times of everything (we have eaten it eight times in the last month) and I am content that this is its final form for maximum flavor and  equal consistency. Let’s cook.

Here are the ingredients you need:
2tbsp canola oil
1 onion, finely chopped
4 carrots, finely chopped or grated
5 celery stalks, finely chopped, preferably stalks w/ leaves on them
2.5lbs ground beef (88/12 or 90/10 is best)
10 oz tomato paste
2 cups red wine
32 oz petite diced tomatoes
1lb spaghetti noodles, dry or fresh
Grated Parmesan cheese

First things first, you need to cut your onion, carrots and celery stalks as small as possible. Smaller than normal dicing works best, to allow the vegetables to cook through and keep them from hindering your bites with crunchy chewing. Grating them on a cheese grater also works well, just do your best to not have large, square chunks.  You can use a knife, or if you have a food processor with a slicer, that works as well. I ran mine through a food processor.

Next, heat a large (and I mean, LARGE) saute pan over high heat with the canola oil added. A large Dutch oven will also work, or any pan with high walls that can hold all the ingredients listed above by the end of cooking. Once the oil is hot (shimmering), reduce heat to medium and add your celery, carrots and celery, stirring about once a minute for 7 minutes until they’re softened up and the consistency is even throughout (no clumps of vegetables).

Next, add your ground beef and tomato paste to the pan. Use a wooden spoon if you have one, to break up any clumps of ground beef. You’ll want an even consistency throughout the sauce. It’s important to choose a ground beef mixture that is at least 85% meat and 15% fat, but 88/12 or 90/10 works best. Too much fat will keep the sauce from adhering to the noodles, and nobody wants that. Cook the meat until browned and tomato paste is evenly distributed through the whole pan.

Once the meat is browned, stir in your 2 cups of red wine and bring to a simmering boil over medium, stirring constantly. Any type of red wine will work, including Carlo Rossi or two buck chuck. I used a Malbec for this recipe, because it’s my favorite.

Once the wine has started a slight boil, add your 32oz of petite diced tomatoes and its juices to the pan. Turn the pan to a low heat (for example, I have mine set on 3), and simmer for at least 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. The longer you let it simmer, the more the flavors will be able to mingle and get to know each other, and you will have a more uniform consistency. Do not cover with a lid. Season with salt and pepper.

When there is about 20 minutes left on the clock, bring a large pot of water to a boil, and make sure to add a lot of salt. I repeat, a LOT of salt. It should taste like the sea. This will help the noodles absorb more moisture. Don’t worry about the sodium content, as most of will stay in the water. Add your noodles and cook to al dente.

Now, this next step is the most important part. Do NOT strain the noodles after cooking. You will want to make sure they are not completely soft before removing from the water. Rather than straining the noodles, take them directly from the pot of water to your saute pan. While you may think the water on the noodles will water down the consistency of your sauce, the opposite is true. The starch in the water will help to actually thicken your sauce, and help the sauce adhere to the noodles for an evenly distributed coating. Again, this the the most important part. Let the noodles finish cooking while you are mixing them into the sauce. I could obviously use a bigger pan, but this is what I have right now.

Once the sauce and the noodles have mingled for a few minutes and the noodles are coated, serve immediately with some freshly grated Parmesan on top. This recipe makes a large quantity of pasta, so you can either feed a group of people, or have a few day’s of leftovers, like me!

Thanks for checking out the recipe, let me know your thoughts or if you’ve tried it and loved it. Make sure to check out my links below, as well. Bon appetit.
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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
Twitter: www.Twitter.com/LiftBigEatBig
Instagram: www.instagram.com/liftbigeatbig/

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An Argument Against Home/Garage Gyms

In this video, I make an argument as to why setting up a gym in your home or your garage might not be in your best interest. I realize that this is going to churn the butter for some of you, so I request that you watch the video in its entirety before posting your responses: you may end up agreeing with me. Thanks for watching, and be sure to Like and Share the video with your friends.

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LBEB’s suggested items: http://amzn.to/2qzUKKb
Pump Dragon Manual: http://bit.ly/2EhD73y
LBEB Supplements: http://bit.ly/2CQ78e0
LBEB’s Coffee Partner: http://bit.ly/2F9DjU3
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How To Make Your Own Butter

Today, I will show you how to make one of my all-time favorite ingredients: butter!

I use butter in nearly every single meal I make, and I love knowing that the butter in the dish was something I made with my own hands. It couldn’t be easier to make, and gives you a great forearm pump to boot.

All you need is a large Mason jar and 16oz of heavy whipping cream. Once you pour the cream in the jar, simply start shaking with both hands. Pace yourself, but keep the movements high.

I recommend not using more than 16oz at a time for this size of jar, as you need enough empty space in the jar for the cream to collide against, which will be especially important in the later stages.

The first stage of shaking the Mason jar is the easiest, as the cream is in its natural form, like thick water.

The second stage is when it starts getting thicker, and will have a consistency somewhat like whipped cream.

The third stage is where things start getting tougher. The cream will become so thick that you will need to let it settle on one side of the jar, then turn the jar over and “throw” it in a downward motion as hard as you can. Keep your hands on it, of course. The lack of space that is now in the jar means you need to power through this stage, the end is almost here.

The fourth stage begins when you start to be able to see through the bottle again. Once this happens, shake furiously, as you are in the home stretch.

The last stage is where you can see a clear pile of butter in the jar, which has now become yellow after separation, and liquid at the bottom. This liquid is called “buttermilk.” Clever, right? Unlike store-bought buttermilk, which is just milk and vinegar combined, and tastes horrible, your newly-homemade buttermilk tastes sweet and delicious. It won’t last more than a day, though, so make sure to drink it ASAP, or make some biscuits with it.

Once you remove the butter from the jar, put it in a finely-meshed colander, and run ice cold water over it. This will help harden it before forming, as well as wash off any leftover buttermilk. You won’t want any liquid throughout this butter as it can turn it rancid faster.

After running cold water over it, move your colander in a circular motion, as well as up and down, to help shake off all the liquid. Do this for 4-6 minutes to ensure the liquids are removed.

Finally, I like to put the ball of butter in between two paper towels and giving it a soft squeeze, to force any microscopic liquids out.

I store mine in the freezer for a longer shelf life, and I keep it unsalted, to further control the salt contents of my meals. Plus, freezer butter is easier to cut into the amounts you need to use for any given recipe.

Now you know how to make butter, how exciting! Bon appetit.

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How To Render Your Own Beef Tallow

I have always found something special about being able to figure out how to make my own ingredients, instead of just my own meals. It’s easy to make cookies, or pies, or dressings, but how about making the ingredients that go into the recipes themselves? It brings me a warm fuzzy feeling when I drop a slice of homemade butter into a pan instead of butter I bought at the store, or making pasta from noodles that started out as a pile of flour only 30 minutes before.

Today, I will show you how to make another special ingredient: rendered beef tallow. If you don’t know what tallow is, think of it like vegetable shortening, or something that can be turned into a frying oil with a very high smoke point, that will also impart some great flavor into the food. Tallow is what they used to fry your french fries in, before it became an unfairly- attacked cooking ingredient. Rendering is what the process is called when you turn a hard fat into a liquid fat, “cooking” away all the parts of the fat that can’t be reduced to a liquid. The properties in tallow also make for fluffier biscuits and softer cakes than vegetable shortening could ever hope to compete with. Here’s how it’s done.

First, you will need to procure some beef suet. Suet is the white, cloudy fat deposits that are present around the cow’s kidneys. You can make tallow with any fat, but the less contact it has with the meat of the animal, the better, as you will have to spend a lot of time cutting away the meat from the fat before rendering. The great part about suet is that you can get it for about $1.50/lb at the grocery store or butcher shop.

Next, you need to cut your suet into pieces manageable enough for your food processor. It’s best to do this when the suet is right out of the fridge, so it doesn’t get soft on you. We’re looking for the consistency of finely ground beef. Make sure to pick out any big pieces that aren’t fat from the mixture after processing.

Then, put the processed suet into a pan or dutch oven, inside a cast iron. I like to have the cast iron between the direct heat and my suet pot, so I minimize the risk of burning. Turn the burner on to 2, 3 max, and then it’s simply a waiting game. You will want to give it a stir every 30mins or so, and to check for burning.

After that, it’s just a waiting game. You’re looking for 4-6hrs on the stove top, and you will know it’s done when you see a great deal of liquid, and very small bubbles coming up from the bottom.

Remove the pot from the heat, line a pan with waxed paper, and run the suet through a cheesecloth to filter out any undesirable hitchhikers. You can pour it onto the cheesecloth, although I ladled mine because I’m clumsy and didn’t want to spill any.

Let this sit overnight, then simply break into pieces and put in the fridge or freezer. It should last for six months in the fridge, and 12 in the freezer. I will mix mine with a vegetable medley tonight, and stash the rest for future use. Now you know how to make tallow: how exciting!

Cooking is like chemistry, and you will feel like a mad scientist in the kitchen in no time once you start making your own ingredients. Bon appetit.