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Using Rest-Pause Sets To Your Advantage

Rest-pause sets are one of my favorite techniques to first add some size with extremely high volume, and second, to greatly increase strength.  This method started in the penitentiary where prisoners had to be creative with their training, and do more work in less time.  There is also plenty of research to back this, as a study in the Journal of Science & Medicine in Sport in 2012 showed that a rest-pause set recruited more motor units, and caused more post-workout fatigue than a traditional workout.

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10 Things I Wish I Would Have Learned Sooner

 

I was lucky enough to start weight training at a fairly young age.  Of course with starting young, I had no clue what I was doing, other than what I read out of bodybuilding magazines.  With starting young I made so many mistakes, but with mistakes I was able to learn what worked, and what didn’t.  However there were plenty of things I wish I would have done sooner, and had the patience to improve on. 

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Programming For Success

I find programming for strength training something most people know they should do, but rarely take the step to do so.  I have known many people who say they are going to follow (insert the latest training program here) and maybe follow it for a week or 2 before jumping on the next program.  Program jumping is the biggest mistake I see when working with beginners. 

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Keep Your Head Up: Deadlift Neck Positions

The head position in the deadlift has been a big debate in the strength world for the last couple of years.  Recently, I have been hearing more and more coaches teaching to “pack the neck” and look down to tuck the chin.  I don’t know where this came from but I am telling you: it is completely wrong.  One of the most common mistakes I see in the deadlift is the hips shooting up too soon. 

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Weight-Gaining Tips From A Pro

I’ve said this many times before; if you want to know how to lose weight rapidly or gain weight, talk to an experienced strength athlete or bodybuilder.  I always have to laugh when a skinny teenager comes to me and explains that regardless of how much they eat, they just can’t seem to gain weight.  The first thing I ask: “What was everything you ate today?” Normally the answer I receive is a bowl of kid’s cereal for breakfast, maybe a sandwich for lunch, and then one “huge” meal for dinner. 

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Nutrition Made Simple

Most folks who have competed as a strength athlete or a bodybuilder know a thing or two about nutrition.  Like most of you out there, I have tried just about every diet there is to see what works best for me.  Bodybuilding, I must say is more simple, as strength is not an issue, only looking good onstage (just to point out I am not saying bodybuilding is easier before anyone has a hissy fit). 

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Get Stronger Now

We live in a world where everyone wants results yesterday, so here are a few ways you can dramatically increase performance right away

Remember that strength is a skill, and it is something that needs to be practiced.  I have seen my lifters who have a ton of brute strength put up some big numbers, but they are sloppy with their form. 

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Deadlift Cues & The Paused Deadlift

 

Article written by Matt Mills
Here at LBEB, we are all about the deadlift, and with good reason:  If you want to get bigger, you have to deadlift.  Want to compete in Strongman, Powerlifting, or Crossfit?   Well you better be deadlifting, and deadlifting a lot for that matter.  When it comes to novice and even intermediate lifters, I see a lot of common mistakes, which leads to a lot of missed deadlifts. 

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Workout Nutrition Timing: Fact vs. Fiction

Pre, intra, and post workout nutrition has always been something that I take very seriously when I train.  When I was younger I would simply have a delicious PB&J sandwich, hit the gym, then down a protein shake right after.  However, if you are a serious strength athlete you want every advantage there is to improve performance and recovery.  Also when I was a beginner, I would only train for the most an hour to an hour and a half, so the total volume of work I would do was much lower then what I do now.